Root Canal Treatment PDF Print E-mail

Dental Health: Symptoms Of Endodontic Disease

Common Symptoms requiring an RCT:
• Severe tooth pain, typically relieved by cold water and increases with the intake of hot liquids.
• Pain worsens when you lie down and reduces when you sit up.
• Pain stays for a long time after consuming cold things.
• Swelling around the tooth.
• Constant tooth pain
• Pain when chewing.
• Tooth pain referred to head and ears as well.
• Tooth sensitivity on consuming sweets.

If you have any of the above stated symptoms, it would be advisable that you visit your dentist, since he is the best person to judge whether you have a root canal disease or not, as some of these symptoms may be due to other problems as well.

Endodontic Procedure

Endodontic treatment can often be performed in one or two visits and involves the following steps:
1. The endodontist examines and x-rays the tooth, then put a local anesthetic to make the pain
dissapear.

2. The endodontist makes an opening in the crown of the tooth. Very small instruments are used to clean the pulp from the pulp chamber and root canals and to shape the space for filling.

3. After the space is cleaned and shaped, the endodontist fills the root canals with a biocompatible material, usually a rubber-like material called "gutta-percha." The gutta-percha is placed with an adhesive cement to ensure complete sealing of the root canals. In most cases, a temporary filling is placed to close the opening. The temporary filling will be removed by your dentist before the tooth is restored.



4. After the final visit with your endodontist, you must return to your dentist to have a crown or other restoration placed on the tooth to protect and restore it to full function.

If the tooth lacks sufficient structure to hold the restoration in place, your dentist or endodontist may place a post inside the tooth. Ask your dentist or endodontist for more details about the specific restoration planned for your tooth.

Most teeth can be treated. Occasionally, a tooth can't be saved because the root canals are not accessible, the root is severely fractured, the tooth doesn't have adequate bone support, or the tooth cannot be restored. However, advances in endodontics are making it possible to save teeth that even a few years ago would have been lost. When endodontic treatment is not effective, endodontic surgery may be able to save the tooth.